Installing configuring OS 2; misc. hardware drivers

installing os2, configuring os2, drivers os2, os 2 drivers, download os2, os 2 virtual pc, os 2 config sys

Re: I'll stick with OS/2, not Linux

Staci Hanson wrote:
>    I was wondering too, how much space does a typical OS/2
> install take? I made a 1.5 gig partition and the Linux install took
> over 900mb (although I’m sure I could have pruned much of
> that). I’m going to be using the regular Warp 4, not the Server.

No, I doubt if you’ll need 900 megs for an OS/2 install.

I just ran the numbers on my OS/2 partition and with
Java, Swing, MPTS, TCPIP , FP13 it takes between
100 to 200 megs.

I can remember installing Warp 4 on a 200 megged
partition when it was ‘new’ and believe it took about
95 megs for a full install at the time.

The figure above is for OS/2 only.  All of my applications
and other files are spread out on other partitions, including
my swap file.  (SS/2 along takes up 303,566,943).

You may wish to add a second hard drive.  I suggest
an IBM IDE with at least 10gig.  You never think you’ll
need it but even with 20gig I find I could always use
more space!

Tim…

.
posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (5)

5 Responses to “Re: I'll stick with OS/2, not Linux”

  1. admin says:

    On Thu, 1 Jun 2000 06:29:47, Staci Hanson <StaciHEE…@TheDorm.com>
    wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >    I just got done installing MacMillan Linux-Mandrake 7.0. It was
    > much easier than the RedHat 4.2 I tried before.
    >    I had a few problems like I had my PS/2 mouse connected to
    > a serial port because the wheel stopped working and I thought
    > it might be the adapter that was causing it. Turned out there was
    > a small fuzz ball keeping the wheel from working, but I hadn’t
    > switched back to the PS/2 port. So when I tried installing Mandrake
    > it wouldn’t recognize the mouse. Changing it back to the PS/2
    > port fixed it.
    >    Then after I got the whole thing installed and rebooted, everything
    > worked fine until it got to the command prompt. About a second after
    > asking for login, the screen would go blank and the monitor would
    > start going crazy. I’m sure it was what I answered for the monitor/
    > video card combo that caused this, as neither one was listed in the
    > choices and I had to guess about them.
    >    But I couldn’t see any way of changing them. The screen would go
    > screwy at the prompt and was unusable. I tried booting from the
    > floppy it created, but it still loaded everything from the hard drive
    > and it still crashed.

    Stacy,

    Did you by any chance tell the install routine to start the gui (known
    as X or Xserver) on startup? If so, that’s were you made your mistake.

    Linux can start the gui upon start / login to the system, but you have
    to make damned sure your video is set correctly in the first place.
    Since you didn’t find your card on the list, you probably should have
    set things up for basic 640 x 480 display and monitor for VGA until
    you know how to "tweak" the Xserver for your hardware.

    If you decide to try it again, be sure to NOT set it to boot the gui
    by default. Lots of people get into trouble by guessing and they
    rarely (as you have found out) guess correctly.

    Think of it as installing Warp with a video card that’s not on the
    install’s known list of cards. Warp will default to VGA for you, but
    Linux needs you to tell it to do that.

    BTW, you didn’t mention any hardware specs. What system did you try
    this on?

  2. admin says:

    On Fri, 2 Jun 2000 01:39:51, Staci Hanson <StaciHEE…@TheDorm.com>
    wrote:

    <some bits snipped>

    >    You see, basically what I want to do is have Win98 without actually
    > using Win98. I’m sick and tired of "This program has performed an
    > illegal function…." and all the Blue Screens of Death. (Not to
    > mention the bloated programs and it takes forever to load anything.)
    > (And the cash laid out for each "Upgrade" to fix things that shouldn’t
    > have been screwed up in the first place.) (And the…but I digress…)

    Well, I can understand that. I fix Windoze problems for a living, so
    if you think you get frd up, I’ll switch places with you. :-)

    >    OS/2 looks like it might fit the bill. I know I’ll have to learn
    > new ways of doing things, but it looks so much easier to learn than

    I also agree with this. I started using computers (and building them)
    since the mid 80s when there wasn’t a GUI to use. I went straight from
    a DOS prompt to OS/2 version 3. I haven’t looked back since.

    > Linux. I’m not planning on setting up a server, using networking
    > (other than Dial-up), having a home page, running a business, or
    > any of that stuff.

    Well, the "beauty" of Linux is that is can be as much or as little as
    you need.

    > I just want to get on the Internet, play some
    > games, use multimedia for viewing stuff, not create it, and just
    > stuff like that.

    Then I’ll prepare you for some things right now. OS/2 doesn’t run Win
    games. It doesn’t have a RealMedia player (except for the now outdated
    Real 5 which runs under Win 3.x) to speak of that can play the latest
    formats.

    While there is the Odin project that will (eventually, maybe) allow
    you to run all your Win32 programs, it’s a "work in progress" and as
    such is not what anyone would call "ready for prime time" just yet. I
    certainly wouldn’t suggest that a Joe Average (or Jane Average in this
    case) user try running it just yet. Others may argue that, but that’s
    my assessment of it right now.

    Now, that said, I would say that if you want to surf the ‘Net with
    relative safety, OS/2 is a very good choice. I get a laugh nearly
    every week about the latest email virus, ActiveX security hole,
    Outlook fiasco, etc. It’s a never-ending source of comic material for
    me where I work. Many a time I have almost fallen on the floor
    giggling about Melissa, ILOVEYOU, etc.

    I’ve been running OS/2 here since about 12/94 and I wouldn’t think
    about running anything else for my day to day surfing at home, but I
    do have a Windoze partition on this system that I boot to play things
    like Half Life, Quake III, and a few other games that run ONLY on
    Win9x. It’s a reality that for some things you can’t  avoid using
    Windoze.

    It’s also a reality that software for OS/2 is not something you’ll
    find on the shelf at your neighborhood CompUSA. That’s not to say it
    doesn’t exist (despite what some will tell you), but you have to go
    out and find it; it’s not going to be something you’ll just stumble
    upon. BMT Micro, the OS/2 Supersite, and Indelible Blue are your best
    sources if you haven’t been there yet.

    I’ll leave you with one small peice of advice. Whatever you do, don’t
    use Netscape for all your Internet activities. By that I mean try to
    use Netscape for browsing, period. Use a seperate program for email
    and a seperate program for reading newsgroups. I will maintian that
    Netscape is barely passable for browsing and just plain sucks for
    email and newsgroups. I don’t have enough fingers and toes to count
    the number of times I hear people complaining about Netscape
    corrupting (or losing) the address book or the subscribed newsgroup
    list.

    I welcome you aboard the OS/2 bandwagon. Just don’t think it’s going
    to be the solution to all your troubles. Understand its limitations
    and you’ll be fine. No OS is perfect.

  3. admin says:

    Here in comp.os.os2.setup.misc, Staci Hanson <StaciHEE…@TheDorm.com>
    spake unto us, saying:

    >   Anyway, I’ve decided not to use Linux. When I partitioned the C:
    >drive, I created a new drive for Linux and installed BootMagic, but
    >with Partition Magic there’s no way you hide the Linux drive like you
    >can with OS/2, so Windows creates a new drive letter for it and it
    >messes all the other drive letters up. This isn’t an insurmountable
    >problem, but I would prefer not to have the drives mixed up.

    That shouldn’t happen if you’re installing Linux on a native ext2fs
    (type 82) partition — Windows can’t see those at all!

    >   I was wondering too, how much space does a typical OS/2
    >install take? I made a 1.5 gig partition and the Linux install took
    >over 900mb (although I’m sure I could have pruned much of
    >that). I’m going to be using the regular Warp 4, not the Server.

    My Warp 4 partition here is 306MB with 77MB free.  No VoiceType and I
    skipped some of the applications, but I have networking, multimedia,
    WinOS2 and DOS support, and a lot of other stuff installed.


       -Rich Steiner  >>>—>  rstei…@visi.com  >>>—>  Bloomington, MN
          OS/2 + BeOS + Linux + Solaris + Win95 + WinNT4 + FreeBSD + DOS
           + VMWare + Fusion + vMac + Executor = PC Hobbyist Heaven! :-)
               To define recursion, we must first define recursion.

  4. admin says:

    OS/2 can install in anything from 2M (a bit extreme). Typically from
    100M (very basic) to 300M (all the features). You have to leave enough
    space for fixpack activity (50 to 100M at a guess). Also take into
    account things like Netscape and Java (which is now quite large with all
    its bits and pieces). Most components can be installed on a different
    partition to the OS so a lot of it comes down to how you want to lay out
    your system.
    In these days of lots of disk space, I use 500MB, some use 1GB.

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    Staci Hanson wrote:

    >    I just got done installing MacMillan Linux-Mandrake 7.0. It was
    > much easier than the RedHat 4.2 I tried before.
    >    I had a few problems like I had my PS/2 mouse connected to
    > a serial port because the wheel stopped working and I thought
    > it might be the adapter that was causing it. Turned out there was
    > a small fuzz ball keeping the wheel from working, but I hadn’t
    > switched back to the PS/2 port. So when I tried installing Mandrake
    > it wouldn’t recognize the mouse. Changing it back to the PS/2
    > port fixed it.
    >    Then after I got the whole thing installed and rebooted, everything
    > worked fine until it got to the command prompt. About a second after
    > asking for login, the screen would go blank and the monitor would
    > start going crazy. I’m sure it was what I answered for the monitor/
    > video card combo that caused this, as neither one was listed in the
    > choices and I had to guess about them.
    >    But I couldn’t see any way of changing them. The screen would go
    > screwy at the prompt and was unusable. I tried booting from the
    > floppy it created, but it still loaded everything from the hard drive
    > and it still crashed.
    >    Anyway, I’ve decided not to use Linux. When I partitioned the C:
    > drive, I created a new drive for Linux and installed BootMagic, but
    > with Partition Magic there’s no way you hide the Linux drive like you
    > can with OS/2, so Windows creates a new drive letter for it and it
    > messes all the other drive letters up. This isn’t an insurmountable
    > problem, but I would prefer not to have the drives mixed up.
    >    The drives I had before were C: for Disk1, D:,E:,F: for Disk2.
    > Now they are C:, new D:, former D: is now G:, E: and F: are still the
    > same.
    >    Anyway, I’m going to stick to OS/2 ( as soon as I get it) as it
    > seems to be not nearly as complicated and more like Windows
    > than Linux.
    >    I was wondering too, how much space does a typical OS/2
    > install take? I made a 1.5 gig partition and the Linux install took
    > over 900mb (although I’m sure I could have pruned much of
    > that). I’m going to be using the regular Warp 4, not the Server.

    > ——————————————-
    > Remove HEEHEE from e-mail address to reply.
    > XOXOXOXO

    > Hale Business Systems, Mary Kay Cosmetics,
    > Fuller Brush, and W.R. Grace Company are
    > merging: New company will be called
    > Hale Mary Fuller Grace.

  5. admin says:

    On Thu, 01 Jun 2000 20:39:51 -0500, Staci Hanson wrote:

    :> I just want to get on the Internet, play some
    :>games, use multimedia for viewing stuff, not create it, and just
    :>stuff like that.

    Sorry, but you’ll have to put up with Win98 to accomplish the above
    completely.

    ,c.